Exporting

On Thursday September 21st, President Trump signed Executive Order 13810 Imposing Additional Sanctions with Respect to North Korea (” the E.O.” or “E.O. 13810”).  E.O. 13810 significantly expands the U.S. Treasury Department’s authority to impose a broad range of sanctions unlike those we’ve seen before. The expansion of authority includes the ability to impose “secondary sanctions” on non-U.S. parties who take part in foreign activities involving certain North Korean sectors or entities.  For example, OFAC now has the power to block U.S. correspondent account access to any foreign bank that knowingly conducts or facilitates significant transactions tied to trade with North Korea. (more…)

Canada and Mexico have now appointed negotiating teams of seasoned professionals. Canada also has created a NAFTA Council comprised of public and private sector experts from the energy, auto, labor and agricultural fields. Negotiations will begin in the U.S. during the week of August 16. The next round has already been set to take place in Mexico for the week of September 10. Mexico would like the talks completed by the end of the year, well ahead of the 2018 Presidential election next July. The U.S. has so far acquiesced to such a schedule; however, the Canadians may not be as accommodating. (more…)

The Trump Administration has implemented regulatory changes to continue its predecessors’ decade-long efforts to streamline requirements for exporters and importers. One such project, dubbed the International Trade Data System or ITDS, seeks to modernize and streamline procedures and required government paperwork for exporters and importers while eliminating redundant requirements. This process began in 2006 under George W. Bush when legislation was passed calling for the creation of a single electronic system that would serve as a one stop shop for the government agencies and businesses involved in international trade to exchange necessary documentation. (more…)

We are 100 days into the Trump Administration and  the question is not what did President Trump promise and what did he do, the question is how should business prepare for the future?    Let’s begin with a “State of the Union” so we can evaluate our next steps. On some policy issues President Trump did follow the lead of the last Administration.  The Trump Administration has implemented regulatory changes to continue its predecessors’ decade-long efforts to streamline regulatory requirements for exporters and importers.   One such project will modernize and streamline procedures and paperwork that must be filed with government agencies and eliminate redundant requirements for exporters and importers. His willingness to stay the course on this practical initiative as well as on more controversial issues like relations with Cuba, Iran, and China, suggests that President Trump may develop into a more cautious chief executive. (more…)

You may not have heard of the Office of Export Enforcement (OEE), but if you or your subsidiary are doing business abroad, you should take note. Last month, the OEE, which is part of the Department of Commerce’s Bureau for Industry and Security (BIS), raided the U.S. headquarters of a company whose European subsidiary is suspected of violating U.S. export control and sanctions laws. (more…)

On March 7, we learned that Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation (ZTE) concluded 3 settlement agreements that could result in penalties as high as $1.2 billion for its violations of U.S. sanctions and export controls laws. Although the amount of the fines results from particularly egregious conduct on the part of ZTE to conceal its violations even during the period of investigation,  the case highlights three valuable lessons for all exporters. This is especially true given Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross’s pronouncement that the case signals the new Administration will be “aggressively enforcing strong trade policies with the dual purpose of protecting American national security and protecting American workers.” (more…)

The Commerce Department’s Bureau for Industry and Security (BIS) has issued a new rule that requires exporters to Hong Kong of items subject to certain controls under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to obtain either an import license or a written statement from the Hong Kong government as to why an import license is not required. The rule will be effective on April 19, 2017. (more…)

As the export agencies still strive to implement one system for export licensing and compliance, DDTC has come one step closer by creating a new on-line process for filing CJ requests.  As of November 16 at 5 pm, DDTC will no longer accept paper filings for CJ requests.  This morning, November 21,  DDTC started accepting electronic filings through the new Defense Export Control and Compliance System (DECCS). This new system will replace DTRADE and EFS and will allow the user to save drafts and copy previously inputted data.  Yay. Progress is made one small step at a time. (more…)